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How being in a relationship could cost you £2k more than staying single… but it can be even more expensive for men


  • New data has revealed that young people in relationships are getting into debt
  • Have YOU got into debt trying to uphold a relationship or pay for expensive dates? Email: madison.burgess@mailonline.co.uk
  • READ MORE: I am a dating expert – here are seven huge red flags

New data has revealed that young people in relationships are racking up thousands of pounds worth of debt due to the pressures of social media, compared to their single counterparts.

The research from Experien has detailed how the average 18-35 year old with a partner, ends up £2,250 in debt because of ‘toxic social media narratives’.

When you’re constantly seeing through what other couples are doing and buying for each other online, it can be easy to compare yourself and splash out, even when you can’t afford it.

The data highlighted that for over half of young people (59%) social media influence has contributed to expectations to overspend on their partner or date.

Additionally, almost two-thirds (63%) believe social media has influenced people to date for money and materialistic reasons over love.

New data has revealed that young people in relationships are racking up thousands of pounds worth of debt due to the pressures of social media, compared to their single counterparts (stock image)

New data has revealed that young people in relationships are racking up thousands of pounds worth of debt due to the pressures of social media, compared to their single counterparts (stock image)

And it’s even worse for young men, with 1 in 20 claiming they’ve ended up more than £10,000 in debt from forking out on dates and relationships.

On top of this, over one third of men said they’d browsed a potential date’s social media profile to check if they could afford their lifestyle, whereas only 28% of women admitted to doing the same.

Roughly 10.1 million 18-30 year olds, 16.6% are currently in arrears or default, meaning they have overdue debt or have failed to repay loans. 

When it comes to date nights, four in five men insisted they’d always foot the bill, while less than 1 in 5 women said they preferred to pay.

However, a quarter explained this was because their partner earned more than them.

What’s more is three in 10 men have even changed their mind about whether they should pay on a first date after seeing influential social media content.

The shocking new research comes just after Experian launched a new podcast series to help young people who are struggling to manage their finances in the modern world of dating.

When it comes to date nights, four in five men (80%) insisted they¿d always foot the bill, while less than 1 in 5 women (18%) said they preferred to pay (stock image)

When it comes to date nights, four in five men (80%) insisted they’d always foot the bill, while less than 1 in 5 women (18%) said they preferred to pay (stock image)

Hosted by Celebs Go Dating expert and relationships therapist Anna Williamson, the The Cost of Loving podcast series provides guidance while encouraging healthy conversations about relationships and finance. 

The first episode, which was released just before Valentines Day,  tackled gender expectations, and the ever-divisive bill-splitting debate.

Subsequent episodes in the five-part series will launch throughout February and March, and cover topics such as wage gap relationships, debt, dating and financial infidelity, financial break-ups, and financial abuse red flags. 

However, it’s not all smooth sailing for singletons – the news follows another recent study which revealed that people living alone are paying £10,000 a year more for housing and bills than those who are part of a couple.

The average person living in a couple outside London will pay £11,054 a year for basic household bills, while thanks to the ‘single tax,’ those by themselves pay almost double that at £21,475.

Analysis by AI household money-saver Nous.co revealed that the biggest portion of the so called ‘tax’ goes on rent, an extra £7,608 a year.



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