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Incredible interactive graphic reveals tallest buildings throughout history from the Great Pyramid of Giza to Dubai’s gleaming Burj Khalifa… but a building in LINCOLN ruled the roost for 200 years


For nearly 4,000 years, the Great Pyramid at Giza reigned supreme as the world’s tallest building.

Originally standing at 480feet, it was built as a tomb for an Egyptian pharaoh and remains a magnificent structure today.

But in 1311, when the majestic Lincoln Cathedral was completed, the pyramid lost its towering status.

At 525feet tall, it was the new behemoth of the world, and remained so until 1549.

In the centuries since then, a succession of buildings and structures have held the coveted title as the world’s tallest, including the Eiffel Tower and the Empire State Building.

At 2,722feet, Dubai‘s Burj Khalifa is the current holder, but will soon be overtaken by another gleaming example of Middle Eastern prowess.

When completed, Jeddah Tower will stand at 3,281feet, making it the first building in history to reach beyond 1km. 

Below, MailOnline has created an incredible scrollable graphic which allows you to see the tallest buildings since the Great Pyramid was completed in 2570BC. 

Great Pyramid of Giza (2570 BC to 1311) – 480feet

The Great Pyramid of Giza was built more than 4,500 years ago in around 2570BC as a tomb for King Khufu, who was the second pharaoh of Ancient Egypt‘s fourth dynasty.

The magnificent structure was originally 480feet (146metres) tall, but erosion over the centuries has seen its height diminish to just over 450feet.

It is made up of 2.4million limestone blocks and has withstood earthquakes, wars and the damage wrought by explorer Major General Howard Vyse.

In 1837 he used dynamite to blast his way through the structure before naming four inner chambers after his friends. 

The Great Pyramid of Giza was built more than 4,500 years ago in around 2570BC as a tomb for King Khufu, who was the second pharaoh of Ancient Egypt 's fourth dynasty. The magnificent structure was originally 480feet (146metres) tall, but erosion over the centuries has seen its height diminish to just over 450feet. It is made up of 2.4million limestone blocks and has withstood earthquakes, wars and the damage wrought by explorer Major General Howard Vyse

The Great Pyramid of Giza was built more than 4,500 years ago in around 2570BC as a tomb for King Khufu, who was the second pharaoh of Ancient Egypt ‘s fourth dynasty. The magnificent structure was originally 480feet (146metres) tall, but erosion over the centuries has seen its height diminish to just over 450feet. It is made up of 2.4million limestone blocks and has withstood earthquakes, wars and the damage wrought by explorer Major General Howard Vyse

Described as the 'most precious piece of architecture in the British Isles' by celebrated writer John Ruskin, Lincoln Cathedral was once the envy of the world. Although initially completed in 1092, it was severely damaged by an earthquake in 1185 and so had to be rebuilt. When that project concluded in 1311, the cathedral - including its spire - was an incredible 525feet (160m) tall and was visible from 30miles away

Described as the ‘most precious piece of architecture in the British Isles’ by celebrated writer John Ruskin, Lincoln Cathedral was once the envy of the world. Although initially completed in 1092, it was severely damaged by an earthquake in 1185 and so had to be rebuilt. When that project concluded in 1311, the cathedral – including its spire – was an incredible 525feet (160m) tall and was visible from 30miles away

Lincoln Cathedral (1311 to 1549) – 525feet

Described as the ‘most precious piece of architecture in the British Isles’ by celebrated writer John Ruskin, Lincoln Cathedral was once the envy of the world.

Although initially completed in 1092, it was severely damaged by an earthquake in 1185 and so had to be rebuilt. 

When that project concluded in 1311, the cathedral – including its spire – was an incredible 525feet (160m) tall and was visible from 30miles away. 

It would reign as the world’s tallest structure for more than 200 years, before a storm destroyed its spire in the 1540s. 

St Mary’s Church (1549 to 1569 and 1573 to 1647) – 495feet

After Lincoln Cathedral’s spire collapsed, St Mary’s Church in Stralsund, northern Germany, became the world’s tallest building.

At 495feet high (151m), it is one of Europe’s finest examples of Brick Gothic architecture.

The church also houses an incredibly ornate organ, built in the baroque style by Friedrich Stellwagen. 

The church lost its title as the world’s tallest structure in 1569, when France’s Beauvais Cathedral was completed.

But, when the latter structure collapsed in 1573, St Mary’s regained its premier status and held it until 1647, when the spire was destroyed by lightning. 

A glittering example of French Rayonnant Gothic architecture, Strasbourg Cathedral stretches 470feet (142) into the air. Work on the building began early in the 11th century, but it was not completed until 1439. It was described by great French Romantic writer Victor Hugo as a 'gigantic and delicate marvel'

A glittering example of French Rayonnant Gothic architecture, Strasbourg Cathedral stretches 470feet (142) into the air. Work on the building began early in the 11th century, but it was not completed until 1439. It was described by great French Romantic writer Victor Hugo as a ‘gigantic and delicate marvel’

Strasbourg Cathedral (1647 to 1874) – 470feet

A glittering example of French Rayonnant Gothic architecture, Strasbourg Cathedral stretches 470feet (142) into the air. 

Work on the building began early in the 11th century, but it was not completed until 1439.

It was described by great French Romantic writer Victor Hugo as a ‘gigantic and delicate marvel’.

St Nicholas Church (1874 to 1876) – 483feet

The Church of St Nicholas, in Hamburg, was the world’s tallest building for just two years, from 1874 until 1876. 

The 483foot-high (147m) structure had been rebuilt after an earlier brick church, which had stood since the 14th century, was destroyed by fire.

Sadly, much of the original 19th century structure was destroyed in the Allied bombing of Hamburg in the Second World War, but it was restored in the decades after the conflict.

Rouen Cathedral (1876 to 1880) – 500feet

When its spire was completed in 1876, Rouen Cathedral in Normandy, France, became the world’s tallest building. 

The church is famous for its three towers, the tallest of which is just under 500feet high (151metres). 

Impressionist master Claude Monet also catapulted it into the public imagination with his series of paintings, which toured the world.  

Although the present structure has only stood since the 19th century, it has been built and rebuilt over the course of more than 800 years. 

The Church of St Nicholas, in Hamburg, was the world's tallest building for just two years, from 1874 until 1876. The 483foot-high (147m) structure had been rebuilt after an earlier brick church, which had stood since the 14th century, was destroyed by fire. Sadly, much of the original 19th century structure was destroyed in the Allied bombing of Hamburg in the Second World War, but it was restored in the decades after the conflict

The Church of St Nicholas, in Hamburg, was the world’s tallest building for just two years, from 1874 until 1876. The 483foot-high (147m) structure had been rebuilt after an earlier brick church, which had stood since the 14th century, was destroyed by fire. Sadly, much of the original 19th century structure was destroyed in the Allied bombing of Hamburg in the Second World War, but it was restored in the decades after the conflict

When its spire was completed in 1876, Rouen Cathedral in Normandy, France, became the world's tallest building. The church is famous for its three towers, the tallest of which is just under 500feet high (151metres). Impressionist master Claude Monet also catapulted it into the public imagination with his series of paintings, which toured the world. Although the present structure has only stood since the 19th century, it has been built and rebuilt over the course of more than 800 years

When its spire was completed in 1876, Rouen Cathedral in Normandy, France, became the world’s tallest building. The church is famous for its three towers, the tallest of which is just under 500feet high (151metres). Impressionist master Claude Monet also catapulted it into the public imagination with his series of paintings, which toured the world. Although the present structure has only stood since the 19th century, it has been built and rebuilt over the course of more than 800 years

When Cologne Cathedral was finally completed in 1880 after standing unfinished for more than 300 years, it became the world's tallest building. Although it lost its title in 1884, it remains the tallest twin-spired church in the world. The structure in western Germany stands at 515 feet (157m) and was built according to the original medieval plans that were put together in the 13th century

When Cologne Cathedral was finally completed in 1880 after standing unfinished for more than 300 years, it became the world’s tallest building. Although it lost its title in 1884, it remains the tallest twin-spired church in the world. The structure in western Germany stands at 515 feet (157m) and was built according to the original medieval plans that were put together in the 13th century

Cologne Cathedral (1880 to 1884) – 515feet

When Cologne Cathedral was finally completed in 1880 after standing unfinished for more than 300 years, it became the world’s tallest building.

Although it lost its title in 1884, it remains the tallest twin-spired church in the world.

The structure in western Germany stands at 515 feet (157m) and was built according to the original medieval plans that were put together in the 13th century. 

Washington Monument (1884 to 1889) – 554feet

Made of marble, granite and bluestone gneiss, the Washington Monument commemorates George Washington, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.

The Egyptian-style obelisk stands at 554feet (169metres) and boasts walls that are 15feet (4.6m) thick at their base. 

Inside is a staircase which takes visitors right to the top, where they can see spectacular sights such as the US Capitol Building. 

Made of marble, granite and bluestone gneiss, the Washington Monument commemorates George Washington, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. The Egyptian-style obelisk stands at 554feet (169metres) and boasts walls that are 15feet (4.6m) thick at their base. Inside is a staircase which takes visitors right to the top, where they can see spectacular sights such as the US Capitol Building

Made of marble, granite and bluestone gneiss, the Washington Monument commemorates George Washington, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. The Egyptian-style obelisk stands at 554feet (169metres) and boasts walls that are 15feet (4.6m) thick at their base. Inside is a staircase which takes visitors right to the top, where they can see spectacular sights such as the US Capitol Building

When the Eiffel Tower was completed in 1889, it towered over every other building in the world. At nearly 986feet (300metres) it is more than 400feet taller than the Washington Monument. Built to mark the 100th anniversary of the French Revolution and to form the centrepiece of the 1889 World's Fair, it remains one of the world's most popular attractions. The tower also became the ill-fated testing ground for inventor Franz Reichelt, who died in 1912 when he jumped off it wearing a homemade parachute

When the Eiffel Tower was completed in 1889, it towered over every other building in the world. At nearly 986feet (300metres) it is more than 400feet taller than the Washington Monument. Built to mark the 100th anniversary of the French Revolution and to form the centrepiece of the 1889 World’s Fair, it remains one of the world’s most popular attractions. The tower also became the ill-fated testing ground for inventor Franz Reichelt, who died in 1912 when he jumped off it wearing a homemade parachute

The Art Deco Chrysler Building was the world's tallest for just 11 months after its completion in 1930. It stands at 1,046feet (319m) in New York, but is now just the 12th-tallest building in the city. It was built by automotive tycoon Walter Chrysler and features a lobby decked out in dark African wood and marble

The Art Deco Chrysler Building was the world’s tallest for just 11 months after its completion in 1930. It stands at 1,046feet (319m) in New York, but is now just the 12th-tallest building in the city. It was built by automotive tycoon Walter Chrysler and features a lobby decked out in dark African wood and marble

Eiffel Tower (1889 to 1930) – 986feet

When the Eiffel Tower was completed in 1889, it towered over every other building in the world.

At nearly 986feet (300metres) it is more than 400feet taller than the Washington Monument.

Built to mark the 100th anniversary of the French Revolution and to form the centrepiece of the 1889 World’s Fair, it remains one of the world’s most popular attractions.

The tower also became the ill-fated testing ground for inventor Franz Reichelt, who died in 1912 when he jumped off it wearing a homemade parachute.

Chrysler Building (1930 to 1931) – 1,046feet

The Art Deco Chrysler Building was the world’s tallest for just 11 months after its completion in 1930.

It stands at 1,046feet (319m) in New York, but is now just the 12th-tallest building in the city.

It was built by automotive tycoon Walter Chrysler and features a lobby decked out in dark African wood and marble. 

Empire State Building (1931 to 1967) – 1,454feet

The Empire State Building took little more than year to complete.

Standing at 1,454feet (443metres), it once towered over every other structure in New York when it was finished in 1931. 

With its 102nd-floor observatory – where tourists can see for miles across the US’s most famous city – it is hugely popular with millions of tourists.

It has become a symbol of New York and has featured in dozens of films and TV shows ever since it first appeared in 1933 film King Kong. 

The Empire State Building took little more than year to complete. Standing at 1,454feet (443metres), it once towered over every other structure in New York when it was finished in 1931. With its 102nd-floor observatory - where tourists can see for miles across the US's most famous city - it is hugely popular with millions of tourists. It has become a symbol of New York and has featured in dozens of films and TV shows ever since it first appeared in 1933 film King Kong

The Empire State Building took little more than year to complete. Standing at 1,454feet (443metres), it once towered over every other structure in New York when it was finished in 1931. With its 102nd-floor observatory – where tourists can see for miles across the US’s most famous city – it is hugely popular with millions of tourists. It has become a symbol of New York and has featured in dozens of films and TV shows ever since it first appeared in 1933 film King Kong

When construction on Moscow's Ostankino Tower concluded in 1967, its new status as the world's tallest structure was heralded by its Soviet creators. The tower, which stands at 1,772feet (540metres) beamed TV signals across the region, providing coverage for millions of Russians. The structure was seriously damaged by a fire in the year 2000 and also became the focus of international attention in 2004, when a base jumper collided with it

When construction on Moscow’s Ostankino Tower concluded in 1967, its new status as the world’s tallest structure was heralded by its Soviet creators. The tower, which stands at 1,772feet (540metres) beamed TV signals across the region, providing coverage for millions of Russians. The structure was seriously damaged by a fire in the year 2000 and also became the focus of international attention in 2004, when a base jumper collided with it

At 1,815feet (553metres) tall, Toronto's CN Tower was the world's tallest structure for 32 years. Its revolving restaurant and 360-degree observation tower make it one of the world's most popular tourist attractions. Today it provides signals for 17 Canadian TV and radio stations and welcomes more than two million tourists every year

At 1,815feet (553metres) tall, Toronto’s CN Tower was the world’s tallest structure for 32 years. Its revolving restaurant and 360-degree observation tower make it one of the world’s most popular tourist attractions. Today it provides signals for 17 Canadian TV and radio stations and welcomes more than two million tourists every year

Ostankino Tower (1967-1975) – 1,772feet

When construction on Moscow’s Ostankino Tower concluded in 1967, its new status as the world’s tallest structure was heralded by its Soviet creators.

The tower, which stands at 1,772feet (540metres) beamed TV signals across the region, providing coverage for millions of Russians.

The structure was seriously damaged by a fire in the year 2000 and also became the focus of international attention in 2004, when a base jumper collided with it. 

CN Tower (1975 to 2007) – 1,815feet

At 1,815feet (553metres) tall, Toronto’s CN Tower was the world’s tallest structure for 32 years.

Its revolving restaurant and 360-degree observation tower make it one of the world’s most popular tourist attractions. 

Today it provides signals for 17 Canadian TV and radio stations and welcomes more than two million tourists every year. 

Burj Khalifa (2007 to present) – 2,722feet

A gleaming needle of steel and aluminium, Dubai’s Burj Khalifa is a wonder of modern engineering.

Standing at 2,722feet (829metres), the structure can be seen from 60miles away and houses the world’s first Armani hotel, as well as 900 residences. 

To ensure the tower doesn’t twist or break during bad weather, it is built in a Y-shape, with three ‘wings’ evenly distributing the building’s weight. 

A gleaming needle of steel and aluminium, Dubai's Burj Khalifa is a wonder of modern engineering. Standing at 2,722feet (829metres), the structure can be seen from 60miles away and houses the world's first Armani hotel, as well as 900 residences. To ensure the tower doesn't twist or break during bad weather, it is built in a Y-shape, with three 'wings' evenly distributing the building's weight

A gleaming needle of steel and aluminium, Dubai’s Burj Khalifa is a wonder of modern engineering. Standing at 2,722feet (829metres), the structure can be seen from 60miles away and houses the world’s first Armani hotel, as well as 900 residences. To ensure the tower doesn’t twist or break during bad weather, it is built in a Y-shape, with three ‘wings’ evenly distributing the building’s weight

At 3,281feet when completed, the Jeddah Tower in the Saudi Arabian city of the same will be world's first building to be more than 1km tall. Work on the project began in 2013 but construction had to be paused in 2018 due to labour shortages. Building work finally resumed last year. Jeddah Tower, which is the brainchild of Saudi Billionaire Prince Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, will house luxury apartments, a Four Seasons hotel and offices. It is set to cost £900million to build

At 3,281feet when completed, the Jeddah Tower in the Saudi Arabian city of the same will be world’s first building to be more than 1km tall. Work on the project began in 2013 but construction had to be paused in 2018 due to labour shortages. Building work finally resumed last year. Jeddah Tower, which is the brainchild of Saudi Billionaire Prince Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, will house luxury apartments, a Four Seasons hotel and offices. It is set to cost £900million to build

Jeddah Tower (not yet completed) – 3,281feet

At 3,281feet when completed, the Jeddah Tower in the Saudi Arabian city of the same name will be world’s first building to be more than 1km tall.

Work on the project began in 2013 but construction had to be paused in 2018 due to labour shortages. Building work finally resumed last year.

Jeddah Tower, which is the brainchild of Saudi Billionaire Prince Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, will house luxury apartments, a Four Seasons hotel and offices. 

It is set to cost £900million to build.  



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