News

Interactive map reveals Ofsted’s worst-rated secondary schools in England – is YOUR child’s on the list?


Ofsted officials have branded 84 secondary schools as failing during inspections during the first six weeks of 2024. 

Figures seen by MailOnline  showed that of the 322 Ofsted reports published so far this year, some 84 have been graded as either Inadequate or Require Improvement. 

Ofsted grades schools on a four-point scale from Outstanding, through Good, Requires Improvement and worst of all, Inadquate. 

So far 55 schools have been graded as Outstanding, including Ark King Solomon Academy in north west London; Avonbourne Boys’ Academy in Bournemouth and Aylesbury High School in Nottingham

A further 139 have been classed as ‘Good’.

Disappointingly, 55 schools have been graded as requiring improvement, including Park Academy West in Hillingdon; Queen Elizabeth’s School in Wimborne, Dorset and Newhouse Academy in Heywood, Lancashire. 

Of most concern are the 30 results which found schools to be Inadequate. 

Figures seen by MailOnline showed that of the 322 Ofsted reports published so far this year, some 84 have been graded as either Inadequate or Require Improvement (file photo)

Figures seen by MailOnline showed that of the 322 Ofsted reports published so far this year, some 84 have been graded as either Inadequate or Require Improvement (file photo)

Progress Schools of Hamilton Square on the Wirral fell from Good in a report from June 2021 to Inadequate on a report published on St Valentine’s Day. 

The independent school has annual fees for day pupils of between £13,500 and £38,000 and has 60 pupils aged between 11 and 16. 

According to the report: ‘All the places at the school are commissioned by the local authority for pupils who have been excluded. Most pupils have social, emotional and mental health needs.’ 

The inspectors found many of the pupils have developed ‘negative views of education’ and the school has ‘low expectations of what some pupils, including those with special educational needs and / or disabilities (SEND), can and should achieve.’ 

The report found the pupils’ behaviour in lessons and around the school is ‘poor’ and the quality of education has ‘declined since the previous inspection’. 

Newbury Independent School in Aston, Birmingham is another school which educates SEND pupils and those who have had problems studying. 

It charges local authorities between £54,752 and £97,500 to educate up to 60 pupils. 

So far 55 schools have been graded as Outstanding, including Ark King Solomon Academy in north west London ; Avonbourne Boys' Academy in Bournemouth and Aylesbury High School in Nottingham (file photo)

So far 55 schools have been graded as Outstanding, including Ark King Solomon Academy in north west London ; Avonbourne Boys’ Academy in Bournemouth and Aylesbury High School in Nottingham (file photo)

According to the Ofsted report: ‘Pupils who attend Newbury Independent School are not being educated well enough. The school does not pay enough attention to pupils’ well-being and it fails to take full account of the things that put pupils at risk of harm. Leaders do not identify and act on concerns quickly enough. This means that pupils do not always receive the help they may need.’ 

Ofsted’s single word grades have been criticised by MPs following the tragic death of head teacher Ruth Perry who took her own life when an inspection downgraded her school, Caversham Primary School in Reading from Outstanding to Inadequate. 

A coroner concluded that an Ofsted inspection in November 2022 contributed to her death. 

The schools watchdog has also been urged to avoid inspecting facilities blighted by the reinforced autoclaved aerated concrete (Raac) scandal. 

A total of 231 schools and colleges in England were confirmed as having Raac on their premises as of November 27 last year, according to the list published by the Department for Education (DfE).

Ofsted said it would avoid inspecting any school or college that was on the DfE’s list of education settings affected by Raac during the autumn term.

This term, a school or college that has confirmed Raac on site will be eligible for an inspection, but Ofsted said an affected setting can ask for an inspection to be deferred.

Education experts at Durham University recently called for pupils at schools where teaching has been badly affected by Raac to have their GCSE and A-level results uplifted by up to 10 per cent.

A statement by Ofsted said: ‘This spring term, a school that has confirmed Raac in some of their buildings will be eligible for Ofsted inspection; however, this will be sufficient grounds to defer the inspection, should the school wish to.

Head teacher Ruth Perry, pictured, took her own life shortly after an Ofsted report downgraded her school from Outstanding to Inadequate. An inquest into her tragic death found the report may have contributed to her suicide

Head teacher Ruth Perry, pictured, took her own life shortly after an Ofsted report downgraded her school from Outstanding to Inadequate. An inquest into her tragic death found the report may have contributed to her suicide

Ofsted has announced it may defer inspections on schools affected by the Raac concrete scandal

Ofsted has announced it may defer inspections on schools affected by the Raac concrete scandal

‘We know that the situation with Raac is still causing challenges for school staff, pupils and their parents and guardians.

‘For schools that do not have confirmed Raac but may still be impacted by Raac – for example, where a school is hosting pupils from schools that have Raac – we will carefully consider any requests for a deferral of an inspection.

‘If we have any concerns, we retain the right to inspect any setting, including those affected by Raac.

A Department for Education spokesperson said: ‘The safety of staff and pupils is paramount, and we have been working at pace with schools to identify Raac and support them to minimise disruption.

‘We have committed to fund the removal of Raac from our schools either through grants, or through our School Rebuilding Programme and we will inform schools as soon as possible once our assessments have concluded.’



Source link

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button