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Manchester United’s Teddy Sheringham and Andy Cole were known not to see eye to eye. But what other football players struggled to be ‘teammates’?


QUESTION It’s well known that Manchester United’s Teddy Sheringham and Andy Cole didn’t see eye to eye. What other players struggled to be ‘teammates’?

On the pitch, Andy Cole and Teddy Sheringham formed a professional partnership, scoring at a rate of a goal every 85 minutes. Off the pitch, they wouldn’t talk to each other.

The problem stemmed from Cole’s England debut against Uruguay in March 1995. Sheringham, a Spurs player at the time, was substituted for Cole by manager Terry Venables in the 71st minute. Cole offered his hand and Sheringham snubbed it, leaving him humiliated.

Sheringham joined Manchester United in 1997 but the two men could not get on. Cole said: ‘I would rather sit down and have a cuppa with Neil Ruddock, who broke my leg in two places in 1996, than with Teddy Sheringham.’ 

Nevertheless, a decade after they had retired, the two men buried the hatchet after bumping into each other in a nightclub.

On the pitch, Andy Cole (left) and Teddy Sheringham (right) formed a professional partnership, scoring at a rate of a goal every 85 minutes. Off the pitch, they wouldn't talk to each other

On the pitch, Andy Cole (left) and Teddy Sheringham (right) formed a professional partnership, scoring at a rate of a goal every 85 minutes. Off the pitch, they wouldn’t talk to each other

Bayern Munich players Lothar Matthaus (left) and Stefan Effenberg (right) disliked each other so much that Effenberg included a chapter in his autobiography entitled What Lothar Matthaus Knows About Football, consisting of a blank page

Bayern Munich players Lothar Matthaus (left) and Stefan Effenberg (right) disliked each other so much that Effenberg included a chapter in his autobiography entitled What Lothar Matthaus Knows About Football, consisting of a blank page

There was a burning animosity between Liverpool legends 'Iron' Tommy Smith and Emlyn 'Crazy Horse' Hughes (pictured together), two of Liverpool's greatest captains

There was a burning animosity between Liverpool legends ‘Iron’ Tommy Smith and Emlyn ‘Crazy Horse’ Hughes (pictured together), two of Liverpool’s greatest captains

Bayern Munich players Lothar Matthaus and Stefan Effenberg disliked each other so much that Effenberg included a chapter in his autobiography entitled What Lothar Matthaus Knows About Football, consisting of a blank page.

There was a burning animosity between Liverpool legends ‘Iron’ Tommy Smith and Emlyn ‘Crazy Horse’ Hughes, two of Liverpool’s greatest captains. Smith’s dislike for Hughes dated back to 1973 when, after a fallout with manager Bill Shankly, Smith was replaced by Hughes.

After Shankly’s unexpected retirement in 1974, Hughes – much to Smith’s chagrin – was confirmed as the captain by his successor, Bob Paisley.  Paisley was aware of the situation: ‘Some of Emlyn’s teammates weren’t that fond of him and one of them, Tommy Smith, absolutely hated him. Smithy and Hughes never spoke to each other.’

In the England cricket dressing room, Kevin Pietersen would upset his teammates by badmouthing them to the opposition. Spin bowler Graeme Swann said: ‘Me and Kev never liked each other anyway. 

We actually got on better professionally because we were honest with each other. I wanted a Kevin Pietersen who was scoring runs because he was simply one of the best in the world.’

Greg Foster, Telford, Shropshire.

QUESTION Why do people have vivid and disturbing dreams when they are ill?

These disturbing dreams are known as fever dreams. Powerful fevers are known to trigger waking hallucinations, irritability and confusion, so it’s clear that elevated temperatures can affect cognitive function. However, the precise mechanism for this is unknown.

One theory is that high temperatures may disrupt the brain’s normal cognitive processes during REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. 

These disturbing dreams are known as fever dreams. Powerful fevers are known to trigger waking hallucinations, irritability and confusion, so it's clear that elevated temperatures can affect cognitive function (stock image)

These disturbing dreams are known as fever dreams. Powerful fevers are known to trigger waking hallucinations, irritability and confusion, so it’s clear that elevated temperatures can affect cognitive function (stock image)

During this time, when most of your vivid dreams occur, your body already has a harder time controlling your internal temperature. 

The fever may add to this already strained process, which could lead to disturbed dreams.

Daniel Nielsen, Oxford.

QUESTION Horses always fall over at speed in western movies. Did any animal rights movements try to ban this?

In Britain, cruelty to animals in film is forbidden by law. Animal welfare in the U.S. is overseen by the American Humane Association (AHA), which holds exclusive rights to the ‘no animals were harmed’ disclaimer.

Concern had been expressed in the British Press during the 1930s at films that were suspected of showing actual animal cruelty – one prominent example being Island Of Lost Souls (1932), which featured apparent scenes of vivisection.

Matters came to a head in 1936 following Hollywood’s The Charge Of The Light Brigade. Errol Flynn was appalled at the treatment of horses in the film.

In his autobiography My Wicked, Wicked Ways, speaking on the production of westerns, he wrote: ‘A device called ‘the running W’ was used – a trip wire, to make animals tumble at the right instant. 

Matters came to a head in 1936 following Hollywood’s The Charge Of The Light Brigade (pictured above)

This was routinely ignored and matters came to a head with the release of Jesse James (1939, pictured above). A notorious scene featured James, played by Tyrone Power, being pursued on horseback

This was routinely ignored and matters came to a head with the release of Jesse James (1939, pictured above). A notorious scene featured James, played by Tyrone Power, being pursued on horseback

In 1940 the AHA was given powers to supervise animal handling, but it lacked authority. Michael Cimino barred the AHA from monitoring his western Heaven's Gate (pictured above) in 1980

In 1940 the AHA was given powers to supervise animal handling, but it lacked authority. Michael Cimino barred the AHA from monitoring his western Heaven’s Gate (pictured above) in 1980

The stuntman riding the horse knew where the wire was. He knew when he had to get off and take a fall. But the horse would go headfirst and sometimes get hurt and have to be shot.’

Britain responded with the Cinematograph Films (Animals) Act of 1937. Still in force, this prohibits the exhibition or supply of a film if animals have been subject to ‘the cruel infliction of pain or terror’ or ‘the cruel goading of any animal to fury’.

TOMORROW’S QUESTIONS… 

Q: Who was the very first ‘whistleblower’?

Francis J. Fox, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk.

Q: What was the world’s oldest known curse?

Kerry Bradley, Chertsey, Surrey. 

Q: Is it true that Abraham Lincoln had an unusually high-pitched voice? Which other figures from history had unusual voices?

Nathan Edgar, Welwyn Garden City, Herts.

Is there a question to which you want to know the answer? Or do you know the answer to a question here? Write to: Charles Legge, Answers To Correspondents, Daily Mail, 9 Derry Street, London W8 5HY; or email charles.legge@dailymail.co.uk. A selection is published, but we’re unable to enter into individual correspondence 

In 1930s Hollywood, animal welfare was overseen by the Hays Code, a set of guidelines for self-regulation. 

This featured various ‘dont’s’ in regard to subjects such as slavery, sexual content and ‘ridicule of the clergy’ and a series of ‘be carefuls’, one being ‘apparent cruelty to children and animals’.

This was routinely ignored and matters came to a head with the release of Jesse James (1939). A notorious scene featured James, played by Tyrone Power, being pursued on horseback. 

James makes a daring leap across a cliff to elude his pursuers. In order for the scene to be shot, the horse was blindfolded. 

The stuntman raced it onto a sloping greased platform, which was set up to tilt at the right time in order to send both horse and rider into a pond 70ft below. The stuntman survived but the horse’s back was broken and it died in agony.

This prompted a public outcry. In 1940 the AHA was given powers to supervise animal handling, but it lacked authority. Michael Cimino barred the AHA from monitoring his western Heaven’s Gate in 1980. 

According to the AHA, the film featured a genuine cockfight, tripping horses, decapitated chickens and steers purposely bled to smear on actors.

Afterwards, the Screen Actors Guild and the Alliance of Motion Picture & Television Producers contractually authorised AHA oversight of animals in films.

Is there a question to which you want to know the answer? Or do you know the answer to a question here? 

Write to: Charles Legge, Answers To Correspondents, Daily Mail, 9 Derry Street, London W8 5HY; or email charles.legge@dailymail.co.uk. A selection is published, but we’re unable to enter into individual correspondence. 



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