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‘Old school’ police officer who shouted at boy, 11, fuelled the child’s ‘violent and criminal tendencies’, misconduct hearing is told


An ‘old school’ police officer used such excessive force on a ‘naughty’ 11 year old boy he helped fuel the the child’s ‘violent and criminal tendencies’, a misconduct hearing was told.

PC Stuart Pearson’s ‘totally out of proportion’ actions when he wrestled the young child served to exacerbate the boy’s ‘hatred’ towards the police, it was heard.

The experienced officer, 48, raised his voice at the boy, grabbed his arm, and then wrestled with him – resulting in the youngster smacking his head against the wall, leaving a dent.

It was suggested that PC Pearson’s ‘totally unwarranted’ actions contributed towards the boy’s criminal behaviour as he later went on to threaten to kill an officer.

Now, PC Pearson, who has served Hampshire Constabulary for almost 20 years, is facing disciplinary action, accused of gross misconduct.

PC Pearson (pictured) was tasked with reaching a Community Resolution - which are used for low-level crimes - and the boy's father was in and 'encouraging his son to listen to the officers and pay attention'

PC Stuart Pearson’s (pictured left) ‘totally out of proportion’ actions when he wrestled the young child served to exacerbate the boy’s ‘hatred’ towards the police, it was heard

The Hampshire Constabulary misconduct hearing was told in June 2022 PC Pearson and a junior female colleague identified only as PC Rich attended the boy’s home on the Isle of Wight to speak to him after he hit two youngsters.

PC Pearson was tasked with reaching a Community Resolution – which are used for low-level crimes – and the boy’s father was in and ‘encouraging his son to listen to the officers and pay attention’.

The ‘naughty’ boy, who can’t be named for legal reasons, was said to be ‘rude’ and ‘obnoxious’ towards the officers.

PC Pearson asked the child ‘Why did you whack them?’ to which the boy replied ‘Why not?’

The uninterested youth sat on his phone and the constable, raising his voice, told him: ‘Excuse me, don’t talk to me like that, boy.

‘You don’t start talking to me like that – do you understand me?’

Barrister Alan Jenkins, representing Hampshire Constabulary, told the misconduct hearing: ‘The boy was clearly reluctant to engage, dismissive and rude to the officers.

‘This led PC Pearson to overreact, raising his voice and putting his face near to the boy’s.

The Hampshire Constabulary misconduct hearing was told in June 2022 PC Pearson and a junior female colleague identified only as PC Rich attended the boy's home on the Isle of Wight to speak to him after he hit two youngsters. Pictured: File image

The Hampshire Constabulary misconduct hearing was told in June 2022 PC Pearson and a junior female colleague identified only as PC Rich attended the boy’s home on the Isle of Wight to speak to him after he hit two youngsters. Pictured: File image

‘PC Rich, who had not worked with PC Pearson before, clearly found his actions surprising, in that he was escalating the already tense encounter.’

Mr Jenkins said PC Rich described her senior colleague’s approach as ‘old school’ and commented that he ‘escalated the situation’ which potentially put both of them in danger.

He continued: ‘The situation developed by PC Pearson grabbing the boy’s arm and there was a short struggle in which the boy’s head hit the wall, whereby he sustained some minor injuries.

‘The boy’s father was understandably angry and he demanded that both officers leave the house, which they did.’

After his head made contact with the wall, the 11 year old shouted ‘ow’, ‘my f*****g head’, and his father quickly escorted the two officers out.

Mr Jenkins said ‘there was a dent’, adding: ‘The dent was caused by the boy hitting the wall.’

As the officers reached the door, the hysterical schoolboy shouted ‘f*****g pig c***s, don’t ever f*****g touch me like that again’.

His father demanded the pair call his son an ambulance and whilst pointing his finger he shouted ‘that was too much’.

While outside the property, PC Pearson informed the force via radio that he and his colleague had no choice but to ‘withdraw’ after the boy fell into the wall.

PC Pearson told colleagues: ‘He threatened that he was going to hit me. The child then fell forward and hit the wall.

‘The whole thing is on bodyworn footage and we are going to withdraw at this time – we are going to withdraw.

‘He fell into the wall and that’s when the dad became aggressive and accused us of being too forceful.’

It was heard PC Pearson’s conduct has influenced the boy.

Mr Jenkins said: ‘If it is to be suggested that the later conduct of [the boy] is relevant to show that, by June 2022, he was gradually turning into a youngster with violent or criminal tendencies, the Appropriate Authority [Hampshire police] would suggest that PC Pearson’s violent actions played a role in that development.

‘The boy’s strong dislike for the police is plain enough from the bodyworn video material from June 21, 2022, and there are flashes of hatred after he had had his head knocked against the wall.

‘His attitude towards police officers and being a law abiding young citizen is unlikely to have changed for the better after PC Pearson’s actions on that day.’

Mr Jenkins informed the hearing the youth has since made threats to kill police officers.

Mr Jenkins added that the public would be ‘shocked’ if they saw PC Pearson’s actions.

‘They would see an 11-year-old boy behaving like a naughty and unpleasant 11-year-old, but they would also see an officer acting totally out of proportion in response’, Mr Jenkins said.

‘Both the boy and his father suffered harm as a result of PC Pearson’s actions.

‘For the boy, it will be obvious that he had a pre-existing grievance concerning police, but PC Pearson’s actions will undoubtedly have added fuel to that.

One type of harm that might be relevant in this case is the threat of future harm to police officers.’

Mr Jenkins added that ‘PC Pearson’s actions were completely unwarranted’.

He said: ‘Police officers on the front line will regularly have to deal with challenging situations and with members of the public or suspected offenders who may be truculent, surly or downright abusive, and officers will have training and experience to allow them to handle such situations with professionalism.

‘PC Pearson showed none of that.

‘The confrontation with an 11 year old boy should not have presented such a difficulty, and not least because he was being assisted by the boy’s father.

‘There was no cause for PC Pearson to lose his cool or to be physical in the manner that he did.’

PC Pearson denies gross misconduct.

The officer admits that bending down and raising his voice breached a Standards of Professional Behaviour offence.

The three-day misconduct hearing continues.



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