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Pilot explains how those in charge of MH370 could have easily carried out a plot to deliberately crash


A retired Qantas pilot has opened up on what may have happened during the mysterious MH370 flight that disappeared almost 10 years ago.

Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 vanished over the South China Sea during a flight from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to Beijing, China, on March 8, 2014.

The puzzling case made headlines across the world as it seemed the plane, which carried 239 people – including six Australians, disappeared without a trace.

Just one week after the plane was downed, then-Malaysian prime minister Najib Razak claimed there was a ‘high degree of certainty’ communications with MH370’s cockpit were deliberately cut.

One popular theory is the crash was a murder-suicide at the hands of captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah, 53, but it has never been confirmed by authorities.

Retired Qantas pilot and RAAF training captain Mike Glynn (pictured) said someone inside of MH370's cockpit could have depressurised the plane cabin

Retired Qantas pilot and RAAF training captain Mike Glynn (pictured) said someone inside of MH370’s cockpit could have depressurised the plane cabin

Retired Qantas pilot and RAAF training captain Mike Glynn appeared on Sky News Australia’s new documentary – MH370: Ten Years On, set to premiere at 7.30pm AEDT on Tuesday.

He said there were several ways someone inside the cockpit could have incapacitated passengers. 

There’s a chance they could have been on the verge of death without knowing anything was wrong.

Mr Glynn told Sky someone inside the cockpit could have easily locked its door and forced the plane into a confused state by depressurising the cabin.

‘[They’d] make sure the door’s locked, so no one can get in. Nothing that anyone could do,’ he said.

‘When you open these outflow valves, the aircraft depressurises very quickly,’ he said.

‘If the aircraft’s not going to descend, you’ll start to feel very hypoxic within three or four minutes.’

Hypoxia occurs when the body does not receive enough oxygen, which can lead to confusion and a rapid heart rate before the patient loses consciousness.

Mr Glynn added it would have been easy for someone inside the cockpit to keep other people out as locking doors were introduced after the 9/11 plane hijackings.

‘The door will automatically close, and you can lock it by this switch,’ he said.

‘And you can also, there’s a manual deadbolt that prohibits any sort of entry into the flight deck. You can have a full on attack on the door, it’s not going to change a thing.’

Mr Glynn's theorised passengers wouldn't have known they were in trouble onboard the missing flight until they reached a 'hypoxic' state

Mr Glynn’s theorised passengers wouldn’t have known they were in trouble onboard the missing flight until they reached a ‘hypoxic’ state

The wreckage of MH370 has still not been found almost a decade later despite its disappearance triggering the largest ever air-sea multinational search.

However, an Australian fisherman Kit Olver, 77, claimed last year his trawler pulled up what appeared to be the wing of a commercial airliner in late, 2014.

He claims was fishing some 55km off the southeast coast of South Australia, in the Southern Ocean, when his net snagged on something large.

 ‘It was a bloody great wing of a big jet airliner,’ Mr Olver said.

‘I’ve questioned myself. I’ve looked for a way out of this.

‘I wish to Christ I’d never seen the thing… but there it is. It was a jet’s wing.’

As he had held a pilot’s licence, Mr Olver was confident the wing was larger than any on a typical private plane.

His discovery was backed-up by Peter Waring – whose expertise in surveying sea floors led to his involvement in the search for MH370.

Mr Waring said it was ‘plausible’ for debris from the wreckage to be found in southern Australia, considering more than 20 pieces of possible debris have been discovered in Africa.

However, the latest theories and discoveries would be of little comfort to the victims’ families who may never have answers of what happened to their loved ones.

British aerospace engineer Richard Godfrey last month accused the Malaysian Government of abandoning its search for MH370.

He claims the government did not want to invest any more funding into the mission, despite several calls from victims’ families to relaunch search efforts last year.

‘In my view, the Malaysian government does not want the cause of the crash of MH370 to be known,’ he told the Sydney Morning Herald.

‘It does not help to speculate what the motives of the Malaysian Government might be with regard to MH370.’ 



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