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Pro-Palestinian agitator George Galloway is sworn in as the new Rochdale MP after shock by-election win


George Galloway was sworn in as the new Rochdale MP today, making his return to the Commons.

The Workers Party of Britain leader officially took his new seat this afternoon, nine years after last sitting on the green benches. 

His arrival after last week’s shock by-election win in Greater Manchester cameamid fears the pro-Palestinian agitator will fuel simmering tension over Gaza inside and outside the Commons.

Mr Galloway could not resist taking a dig at politicians today as the hardline socialist made a chauffeur-drive return to their ranks in Westminster today.

He arrived at Parliament today in a sleek dark Volvo driven by an aide to be greeted by a crowd of photographers and camera crews, telling them: ‘I always loved the building – the people in it, not quite so much.’

The Workers Party leader is expected to walk into the house alongside Jeremy Corbyn, the former Labour leader who is a close political ally.

In an interview conducted just after his election win on Thursday last week, he suggested teaming up with Mr Corbyn - who sits as an independent after being kicked out of Labour over anti-Semitism - to form a new party.

In an interview conducted just after his election win on Thursday last week, he suggested teaming up with Mr Corbyn – who sits as an independent after being kicked out of Labour over anti-Semitism – to form a new party.

David Davis

Peter Bottomley

The newly elected MP for Rochdale had boasted that former Brexit secretary Sir David Davis would accompany him when he takes his seat in the House of Commons. But Mr Davis has declined.It is thought that the longest-serving MP in the Commons, Conservative Sir Peter Bottomley, will be asked to take part in the swearing-in ceremony instead, if no others agree.

It comes amid fears for MPs safety after extreme elements within the Gaza ceasefire protest movement target individual politicians in Westminster and at their homes and constituency offices.

Mr Galloway was due to meet Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle this morning ahead of his introduction. One senior source told MailOnline it would be ‘interesting to say the least’ given Sir Lindsay’s focus on MPs’ security.

The Workers Party said Mr Galloway planned to make his first speech since returning at Prime Minister’s Questions on Wednesday.

The new MP already appears to be scheming even before his return to the green benches after a gap of nine years.

In an interview conducted just after his election win on Thursday last week, he suggested teaming up with Jeremy Corbyn – who sits as an independent after being kicked out of Labour over anti-Semitism –  to form a new party. 

Both former Labour MPs, they were vocal in their opposition to the Iraq war and are now among the most prominent critics of Israel’s actions concerning the war in Gaza. 

Asked what he would say to Mr Corbyn he said: ‘You saw what happened last night. Set up, announce an alliance of the remaining socialists in the country. 

‘You lead it, I’ll support it. You be leader, and let’s go! Time is running out, the general election might be three months from now.’

However Mr Galloway faces some embarrassment on his return after a senior Tory snubbed his request to swear him in.

The newly elected MP for Rochdale had boasted that former Brexit secretary Sir David Davis would accompany him when he takes his seat in the House of Commons. But Mr Davis has declined.

Treasury Minister Bim Afolami told GB News: ‘The fact that people don’t seem to want to do it is an indication of the standing with which he’s held in the House of Commons, which is not very high.’

On Friday, Mr Galloway, the leader of the Workers Party of Britain, had told Sky News: ‘David Davis is one of the great parliamentarians of today and this age.’

However, after Mr Galloway’s deputy – former Labour MP Chris Williamson – refused to condemn Hamas’s terror attack on Israel, Sir David had a change of heart.

‘I was happy to introduce George because I’m a believer in free speech,’ he said. ‘But his deputy was trying to justify the October 7 attacks and that crosses the line.’

It is thought that the longest-serving MP in the Commons, Conservative Sir Peter Bottomley, will be asked to take part in the swearing-in ceremony instead, if no others agree.

New arrivals in the Commons are always flanked by two MPs when they are introduced by the Speaker.

Mr Galloway was approached by the Mail for comment.



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