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Queen Camilla has an impressive connection to Buckingham Palace – but it’s got nothing to do with King Charles


Queen Camilla has occupied a spot in the limelight for almost three decades, and even more so since her husband King Charles’ succession to the throne in 2023.

Having married King Charles in 2005, the Queen Consort is more than familiar with a life of royalty within the walls of Buckingham Palace – but her own family’s royal blood and link to the historic landmark may come as a surprise to some. 

Ever since the reign of Queen Victoria began in 1837, Buckingham Palace has served as the official home of the sovereign, and, today, it is the administrative headquarters for The King and several members of his family. 

The building, which is currently undergoing essential maintenance work, has 775 rooms, including 19 State rooms, 52 royal and guest bedrooms, 188 staff bedrooms, 92 offices and 78 bathrooms. 

Although the palace has remained largely unchanged for several years, there was one adaptation after Queen Victoria’s wedding in 1840 that provides a special link between the history of the famous building and Queen Camilla. 

Having married King Charles (R) in 2003, the Queen Consort (L) is more than familiar with Buckingham Palace - but her own link to the historic landmark may come as a surprise to some

Having married King Charles (R) in 2003, the Queen Consort (L) is more than familiar with Buckingham Palace – but her own link to the historic landmark may come as a surprise to some

Although distant, the first link to Buckingham Palace comes from Camilla’s royal blood – stretching as far back as three generations. 

The Queen Consort‘s maternal great-great-grandfather, Lieutenant Colonel William Coutts Keppel, was born in 1832. 

The distinguished military figure was the 7th Earl of Albermarle, and through Charles Lennox, he was sixth in the direct line of ascent from Charles II, who reigned over Scotland, England and Ireland in the late 1600s. 

Camilla’s mother, Rosalind Maud Cubitt, was also the great-great granddaughter of Thomas Cubitt, who came from modest beginnings in Norfolk and was the son of a carpenter.

However, Cubitt went on to become an accomplished master builder, who made his fortune while travelling to India and Australia as a carpenter in the late 1700s.  

Having set up his own building firm on the Gray’s Inn Road, London, Cubitt became responsible for iconic buildings such as the London Institute and Belgravia Square – as well as personally building nearly a kilometre of the Thames Embankment.

Camilla’s royal connection to Buckingham Palace comes in following Thomas Cubitt’s arguably most impressive accomplishment – his work on the landmark itself. 

Cubitt built the east front of the palace in 1847, including the famous balcony where Camilla stood to commemorate her crowning as Queen Consort in 2023, and now stands to greet crowds on important occasions. 

Camilla's great-great-great grandfather, Thomas Cubitt, was an accomplished builder who was responsible for building part of Buckingham Palace in 1847

Camilla’s great-great-great grandfather, Thomas Cubitt, was an accomplished builder who was responsible for building part of Buckingham Palace in 1847 

The Queen Consort 's maternal great-great-grandfather, Lieutenant Colonel William Coutts Keppel was the 7th Earl of Albermarle and sixth in line to the throne in the 1600s

The Queen Consort ‘s maternal great-great-grandfather, Lieutenant Colonel William Coutts Keppel was the 7th Earl of Albermarle and sixth in line to the throne in the 1600s

A map of Gray's Inn Road in 1677, around 130 years before Thomas Cubitt set up shop

A map of Gray’s Inn Road in 1677, around 130 years before Thomas Cubitt set up shop

The Thomas Cubitt Statue in Pimlico, which was built following Cubitt's work on iconic buildings such as the London Institute and Belgravia Square, and others in Pimlico and Bloomsbury

The Thomas Cubitt Statue in Pimlico, which was built following Cubitt’s work on iconic buildings such as the London Institute and Belgravia Square, and others in Pimlico and Bloomsbury

After Cubitt’s death in 1855, Queen Victoria said: ‘In his sphere of life, with the immense business he had in hand, he is a real national loss. A better, kind-hearted or more simple, unassuming man never breathed.’

In 2022, FEMAIL revealed the various career pursuits of royal relatives – and the boost you can get from ties to the monarchy.

Princess Eugenie’s husband, Jack Brooksbank, scored a job in Portugal, where he is doing marketing, sales and promotion for property developer Michael Meldman’s Discovery Land Company.

Meanwhile, Princess Beatrice’s husband Edo Mapelli Mozzi expanded his multi-million pound property company Banda Property into Australia, with a series of projects in Sydney.

Even the mother of the Princess of Wales, Carole Middleton, has seen her business, Party Pieces, flourish thanks to her royal seal of approval, sending out 4,000 orders weekly and expanding her business to the U.S. in October 2022.



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