News

Revealed: All 546 words that mean ‘drunk’ – from ‘trolleyed’ and ‘wellied’ to ‘hammered’ and ‘steampigged’… so which is YOUR favourite?


  • Britons have 546 different words for ‘drunk’ according to researchers
  • Almost any word can be used to mean drunk as long as it ends with an ‘-ed’ 

A study has found an astonishing 546 words that are formally defined as meaning drunk, including ‘trolleyed’, ‘hammered’, ‘wellied’ and ‘steampigged’. 

Linguistic researchers have discovered that virtually any noun can be transformed into a ‘drunkonym’ – a synonym for intoxicated – simply by adding ‘ed’ at the end.

It confirms a theory first suggested by comedian Michael McIntyre, who said Britons could understand any word as meaning drunk if it is preceded by ‘I got completely…’

If you’ve ever felt ‘gazeboed’, ‘carparked’ or completely ‘cabbaged’ after a night out, this may come as no surprise. 

Professor Christina Sanchez-Stockhammer, of Chemnitz University in Germany, believes it may be due to Britain’s deeply-rooted culture of social drinking and Monty Python-style absurdist humour.

Researchers have found that Britons have 546 words for drunk and that almost any word can be used so long as it ends with an '-ed'

Researchers have found that Britons have 546 words for drunk and that almost any word can be used so long as it ends with an ‘-ed’

She said: ‘In English, there’s an extremely large number of words that can mean drunk, and more can be formed simply by adding ‘ed’ to the end.

‘It means pretty much any word in Britain can inherit the meaning “drunk” automatically from the context.

‘This humorous modifying of words is only possible because of the way sentences are constructed in English, and because the British really enjoy witty wordplay. For example, it would not work in German.’

She said the funny effect of drunkonyms is often achieved through their indirectness, adding: ‘For example, “gazeboed” and “carparked” are funny because there is no direct relation between the base word and the meaning “drunk”.’

Prof Sanchez-Stockhammer said indirectness is also present in other types of playful language, such as Cockney rhyming slang, which includes drunkonyms like ‘Brahms’ and ‘Schindler’s’ – short for ‘Brahms and Liszt’ and ‘Schindler’s list’, both of which rhyme with ‘pi**ed’.

If you've ever felt 'gazeboed', 'carparked' or completely 'cabbaged' after a night out, this may come as no surprise. Linguistic researchers have discovered that virtually any noun can be transformed into a 'drunkonym' ¿ a synonym for intoxicated ¿ simply by adding 'ed' at the end (stock image)

If you’ve ever felt ‘gazeboed’, ‘carparked’ or completely ‘cabbaged’ after a night out, this may come as no surprise. Linguistic researchers have discovered that virtually any noun can be transformed into a ‘drunkonym’ – a synonym for intoxicated – simply by adding ‘ed’ at the end (stock image) 

She added: ‘We studied for a year in Great Britain and witnessed British culture first-hand. Drunkonyms fit in well with the humourous British outlook on drinking and life in general.’

The study, published in the Yearbook of the German Cognitive Linguistics Association, found that English speakers regularly use a range of alternative words for ‘drunk’.

By the time Britons reach adulthood, most will have experienced so many different drunkonyms that it allows them to recognise even unknown words ending in ‘ed’ as meaning ‘drunk’ in many contexts.

Even though excessive alcohol consumption may come with negative consequences, Britons commonly discuss drunkenness in a light-hearted way, the researchers added.

Explaining the list, Sanchez-Stockhammer said: ‘The following list combines material from the Oxford English Dictionary, Collins Dictionary’s thesaurus, Wiktionary’s thesaurus as well as synonyms for drunk collected by the audience of BBC One’s Booze programme. 

The list is sorted, first in descending order by the number of resources in which the word occurs (indicated by a figure between 1 and 4 in parentheses), and then alphabetically within each frequency group.”

The 546 words for drunk 

Researchers have found that Britons have over 500 different word that we can use to mean ‘drunk.

They discovered that almost any word can be used to mean drunk so long as it ends in ‘-ed’ and follows an adverb like ‘very’, ‘totaly’, or ‘absolutley’

For example: ‘I was totally gazeboed last night’.

Here is the full list: 

bladdered 

inebriated 

intoxicated 

langered 

legless 

mashed 

merry 

mullered 

pickled 

pie-eyed 

plastered 

sloshed 

smashed 

tipsy 

trashed 

wasted 

bevvied 

blasted 

blitzed 

blootered 

blotto 

bombed 

cabbaged 

canned 

fuddled 

hammered

langers 

lashed 

loaded 

ossified 

paralytic 

p*****

rat-arsed 

ratted 

screwed 

slaughtered 

sozzled 

squiffy 

steaming 

stewed 

stoned 

tanked 

tiddly 

tight 

well-oiled 

wrecked 

zonked 

Adrian Quist 

a********

beered-up 

besotted  

blocked 

blottoed 

blue 

bollocksed 

bottled 

buzzed 

clobbered 

c*****

cockeyed 

corned 

corny 

crocked 

c*****

cup-shot 

cut  

disguised  

ebriose 

ebrious 

elevated 

faced 

fap 

flustered 

fluthered 

fou 

fresh

fried  

f***** 

full 

gassed

ginned 

glorious 

gone 

groggy 

high 

honkers

inebriate 

jolly 

juiced 

kaylied 

lamped 

leathered 

liquored up 

lit 

locked 

looped 

lubricated 

lushy  

maudlin  

mellow 

minging  

m*****

moppy 

mortal 

muddy  

munted 

nappy 

obfuscated

obliterated 

oiled  

owly-eyed 

parlatic 

peloothered 

pixilated 

ploughed 

polluted 

potted 

potulent 

puggled

razzled 

ree 

ripe 

ripped 

rubbered 

sauced 

scammered 

schnockered 

screwy 

scuttered 

shedded

shicker 

shickered

skunked 

slewed 

snockered 

snuffy

soaked 

soaken 

sottish 

spannered 

spiffed 

sprung 

squiffed 

steamboats 

stinking 

stinko 

stocious 

stonkered 

strut 

swacked 

swipey 

tanked up 

temulent 

tiddled 

tippled 

top-heavy 

trollied 

trousered 

t*****

twisted 

w*******

wazzed 

wellied 

wet 

zoned 

adrip 

airlocked 

ale-blown 

alecied 

ale-washed 

ankled 

annihilated 

askew 

babalas 

bacchic 

badgered 

baked 

banjaxed 

barley-sick 

battered 

beery 

befuddled 

befuggered 

beliquored 

bent 

Bernard Langered 

besotten 

bibacious 

bibulous 

bingoed 

bitch fou 

blathered 

blatted 

bleezin 

blind

blocked-up 

blown away 

blucked 

bluttered 

boiled 

bonkers 

boogaloo 

boozed 

boozed-up

boozy 

bosky 

bousy 

Brahms 

broken 

buffy 

bumpsy 

bungalowed 

bungfu 

burlin 

burlin’

caned 

cap-sick 

chevy chased 

clear 

cocktailed 

columbered

confuddled 

cooked 

crapulous

cup-shotten 

dagged 

dead-oh 

decimated 

destroyed 

dot cottoned 

drink-drowned 

drinky 

dronkverdriet 

druck-steaming 

ebriate

ebriated 

elephants 

elephant’s 

elephant’s trunk 

etched 

fairish 

falling-down 

far gone 

fecked 

fershnickered 

fighting-tight 

flashy 

fleemered 

flooey 

floored 

fluffy 

flush

flushed

fluted

fly-blown

flying 

foggy

footless

foxed

frosted 

fu’ 

fubar 

FUBARed 

f***** up

f*****-up

f******* up

f***faced

funked up 

funny 

fuzzy-headed

fuzzy-minded

gatted

gattered 

gee-eyed 

genevered 

gesuip 

gished 

goat

goosed 

grogged 

groggified 

guttered 

half channelled over 

half cut 

half lit 

half polluted 

half seas over 

half-and-half 

half-cocked 

half-cut 

half-seas-over 

half-shaved

half-shot 

hamboned

hammer-blowed 

happy 

hazed 

heady 

hearty 

high-flown

hooched up 

hosed 

hot 

howling 

impaired 

incapable 

inebrious 

insober 

insobrietous 

intoxicate 

jagged 

jahalered 

jaiked up 

jaked 

Jan Hammered 

Jan’d 

Jaxied 

jazzed 

Jeremied 

jingled 

jug-bitten 

juiced up 

junked-up 

Kaned 

kisky 

kylied 

lagered up 

lagged up 

langerated 

laroped 

larruped 

larrupt 

lash 

liquefied 

liquory 

lit up 

lit-up 

loo la 

loopy 

loose 

lumpy 

lushed 

maggot 

maggoted 

mandoo-ed 

mangled 

manky 

Maudlin-cupped 

mauled 

mazed-headed 

medicated 

meff’d 

Merl Haggard 

messed up 

mettled 

minced 

ming-ho 

miraculous 

mizzled 

moccasined 

moired 

mokus 

molo 

monkey-full 

moon-eyed 

moony 

motherless 

mottled 

muddled 

muggy 

muntered 

mused 

mustulent 

muzzy 

nase 

nazzy 

near 

newcastled 

newted 

nicely 

obliviated 

oiled-up 

Oliver 

Oliver Twist 

orey-eyed 

overcome 

overrefreshed 

overseen 

overshot 

overtaken 

paggered 

paid 

palintoshed 

para 

paraletic 

paralysed 

paralyzed 

parro 

peelywally 

peevied 

pepst 

pifflicated 

pinko 

piped 

pipped 

p*****

pissy-arsed 

plonked 

plotzed 

plowed 

poleaxed 

pollatic 

potable 

pot-shaken 

pot-shot 

pot-shotten 

pot-sick 

pot-valiant 

pounded 

primed 

queer 

quisby 

raddled 

rat-legged 

ravaged 

reek-ho 

reeling ripe 

rendered

rocky 

rolling 

rosined 

rosy 

rosy glow 

rotten 

rotto 

rouzy-bouzy 

ruined 

rummy 

sat 

scattered 

schickered 

Schindlers 

schloshed 

schnookered 

scratched 

semi-bousy 

sewed up 

shaved 

shellaced

shellacked 

sherry 

s***faced

s****-faced

s***housed 

s***** 

shot 

shwasted 

skimished 

slammed 

slap-happy 

slarmied 

slued 

slug-nutty 

snatered 

snobbled 

snookered 

snozzled 

sodden 

soft 

sotted 

souped-up 

soused 

sozzly 

spanceled 

spancelled 

spangeled 

speechless 

spiflicated 

splashed 

spongelled 

spongy 

spreeish 

squizzed 

steamed 

steamin 

steampigged 

stiff 

stoated 

stonkin 

stotious 

stukkend 

stung 

stunned

swizzled 

tap-shackled 

tashered 

temulentive 

throwed 

tightish 

tilted 

tin hat 

tin hats 

tipsified 

toasted 

toddied 

top-heavyish 

toping 

toppy 

tore up 

tosie 

touched 

tow-row 

toxic 

tozy-mozy 

trolleyed 

troubled

tuned 

t***faced

used up 

warped 

wastey 

wazzocked 

well-corned 

well-cornered 

well-liquored 

well-sprung 

whiffled 

whift 

whiskeyfied 

whiskified 

whiskyfied 

whistled 

whittled 

whole-seas 

whole-seas over 

wineful 

wine-sprung 

wiped 

withered 

wobbly 

woozy 

zigzag 

zombied 

zooted 

zorched 

zotzed



Source link

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to top button