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The 200,000 Ukrainians who have moved to the UK: Interactive map shows the number of refugees in each local authority – as figures reveal up to 66,000 have made the journey home


Kensington and Chelsea and the Derbyshire Dales are the two of the most generous areas when it comes to hosting Ukrainian refugees, official data has revealed. 

More than 200,000 Ukrainians have moved to the UK under the Homes For Ukraine scheme, whereby British households agree to house them for six months.

Many have gone to southern England, which accounts for nine out of 10 local authority areas hosting the most refugees per 1,000 people. 

Top of the list is Kensington and Chelsea, the UK’s ‘richest’ local authority area where residents earn three times the national average – and the home of Ukraine’s embassy.

The West London borough has seen 818 Ukrainians arrive since Homes for Ukraine launched in March 2022, equivalent to 5.71 per 1,000 people. 

TOGGLE THROUGH THE MAP TO FIND YOUR LOCAL AREA, OR CLICK ON THE BLUE ‘TABLE’ TAB TO SEARCH

In a close second are the Derbyshire Dales, with 5.56 per 1,000, followed by South Cambridgeshire (5.47), Wealden (5.00), South Oxfordshire (4.99) and Chichester (4.97). 

The first UK local authority outside England to feature on the list – in 11th place – is Powys in mid-Wales (4.6). 

The first in Scotland is Angus, at 129th and with 2.09 Ukrainian refugees per 1,000 people. 

The Scottish government ran its own version of Homes for Ukraine, the Super Sponsor Scheme, which paused to new applicants in July 2022. 

Saturday marks two years since Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24, 2022. 

The number of people granted a visa who arrived in the UK having fled the war in Ukraine has now topped 200,000, figures published last week showed.

As of February 12, 143,400 arrived under the Homes for Ukraine scheme, while another 56,800 came through the Ukraine Family Scheme. 

Last week the Home Office announced that Ukrainians who came to the UK following the Russian invasion will be able to apply for 18-month extensions to their visas. 

Southern England account for nine out of 10 local authority areas hosting the most refugees per 1,000 people as part of the Homes for Ukraine Scheme

Southern England account for nine out of 10 local authority areas hosting the most refugees per 1,000 people as part of the Homes for Ukraine Scheme 

The first UK local authority outside England to feature on the list - in 11th place - is Powys in mid-Wales (4.6)

The first UK local authority outside England to feature on the list – in 11th place – is Powys in mid-Wales (4.6)

The number of Ukrainians arriving in the UK has dramatically reduced since Russia's invasion in February 2022. The Y axis of this graph shows the number in thousands

The number of Ukrainians arriving in the UK has dramatically reduced since Russia’s invasion in February 2022. The Y axis of this graph shows the number in thousands 

The extension will apply to all three visa schemes established after the invasion: Homes for Ukraine, the Ukraine Family Scheme and the Ukraine Extension Scheme.

The  Ukraine Family Scheme was closed to new applicants on Monday, having previously allowed applicants to join family members in the UK. 

Labour said the move ‘sends the wrong message’ about the UK’s ‘willingness’ to stand by Ukraine while campaigners raised concerns that one of ‘few safe routes’ created to allow families to reunite amid the conflict was ‘closing at such short notice’.

The Government website about the scheme now says: ‘You can no longer apply under this scheme.’

The immigration rules document also said: ‘A Ukrainian national in the UK may qualify under the Ukraine Extension Scheme if they held immigration permission on or between 18 March 2022 and 16 November 2023, or if their last permission ended after 1 January 2022. Applications to this scheme must be made on or before 16 May 2024.

‘A person who has immigration permission as a partner or child of a Ukrainian national who qualifies under the Ukraine extension scheme, who is not themselves a Ukrainian national, may also qualify under the Ukraine extension scheme.

Saturday marks two years since Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24, 2022. Pictured is a woman and her child after fleeing from Ukraine on February 28

Saturday marks two years since Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24, 2022. Pictured is a woman and her child after fleeing from Ukraine on February 28 

‘Children born in the UK to those who have permission under the Ukraine scheme (and the now closed Ukraine family scheme) are eligible to apply under the Ukraine extension scheme.’ 

Another document setting out an assessment of the changes suggested the Home Office no longer deems the family scheme necessary as ‘volumes have been decreasing’ and it is ‘more efficient to simplify the immigration system by operating a single humanitarian scheme for Ukrainians’.

Closure of the scheme is also intended to ‘mitigate the risk of homelessness resulting from accommodation being unsuitable or unavailable’.

Ending the route ‘may cause displacement’ of applicants towards the homes for Ukraine scheme and it is assumed most people will be eligible for the alternative option but there could be a ‘small cohort’ of third country nationals (TCNs) – people who fled Ukraine during the war but are not Ukrainian nationals – who may not be, the assessment warns.

The Home Office was seeing ‘increased litigation’ linked to the family scheme and involving TCNs ‘who were resident in Ukraine at the time of the invasion, but with no Ukrainian family members’, it added.



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