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Trans cyclist Emily Bridges vows to take ban on taking part in women’s events to court as she insists she wouldn’t feel safe competing against men


  • British Cycling those born biologically female could enter its female category 

Trans cyclist Emily Bridges has vowed to take British Cycling to court after it barred transgender women from competing in the female category last year.

The athlete had hoped she would be competing in the Paris Olympics this summer but admitted that part of her life ‘is gone now’ adding that competing is ‘not something I really want to do anymore’.

Miss Bridges, 23, was given the option to compete in the ‘open’ category alongside other transgender athletes, both men and women.

Yet, the cyclist has revealed that she would not feel safe competing alongside men, adding that transgender women should not have to ‘out’ themselves to compete.

She told ITV: ‘I don’t care if I never compete again. It’s for other people who want to compete and it’s just about what’s right.’ 

Trans cyclist Emily Bridges has vowed to take British Cycling to court after it barred transgender women from competing in the female category last year

Trans cyclist Emily Bridges has vowed to take British Cycling to court after it barred transgender women from competing in the female category last year

The athlete had hoped she would be competing in the Paris Olympics this summer but admitted that part of her life 'is gone now' adding that competing is 'not something I really want to do anymore'

The athlete had hoped she would be competing in the Paris Olympics this summer but admitted that part of her life ‘is gone now’ adding that competing is ‘not something I really want to do anymore’ 

The athlete quickly became one of the most well-known transgender athletes in the world last year when the cycling’s governing body announced only those born biologically female could enter its female category.

The controversial decision was made after nine months of consultation. 

Speaking for the first time publicly since the rule was introduced, Miss Bridges said the regulation bans some from competing in elite cycling.

‘A ban is a ban. You can say you can compete in the open category, but we’re women – we should be able to race in the women’s category,’ the cyclist told the broadcaster.

When quizzed on whether she would make a return to the sport, Miss Bridges added: ‘It’s not something I allow myself to think about too much because that part of my life is gone now, and it’s not something I really want to do anymore.

‘If we were allowed to compete, if I was allowed to compete, it would be a different conversation, but I can’t compete.’ 

Miss Bridges, who has transitioned and uses testostrone blockers, has hit back at British Cycling’s peer-reviewed claim that transgender women retain a performance advantage after puberty. 

She questioned how many studies had been carried out on athletes, revealing she had participate in research led by Loughborough University which is assessing the fairness of trans women competing against cis women.

The athlete quickly became one of the most well-known transgender athletes in the world last year when the cycling's governing body announced only those born biologically female could enter its female category

The athlete quickly became one of the most well-known transgender athletes in the world last year when the cycling’s governing body announced only those born biologically female could enter its female category

The athlete believes human rights have been breached by British Cycling and is planning to take the sports body to court.   

She added: ‘When you exclude trans people from public life it is a hell of a lot easier to ban us from other aspects of the public.’ 

At the time of British Cycling’s decision, the Welsh athlete branded called it a  ‘genocide against us’ adding that the move could she her giving up competitive cycling and emigrate.

The cyclist, who set a national junior men’s record over 25 miles in 2018 before transitioning said at the time: ‘I’m having to consider an exit plan from this terrible island.’

MailOnline has contacted British Cycling for comment.  





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