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Trump beats Nikki Haley again by winning the North Dakota Republican presidential caucus


  • Former president clinches another victory in final caucus before Super Tuesday
  • Trump is looking for a clean sweep of all 15 states heading to the polls  

Donald Trump has decisively beaten Nikki Haley yet again by winning the North Dakota Republican caucus in a preview of the dominant night he could have on Super Tuesday.

The former president had a staggering 84.9 percent of the vote while his final rival had just 14.1 with 20 percent of the votes counted at 9.30pm Eastern Time. 

The latest primary victory for Trump caps off the day where the Supreme Court ruled 9-0 he could stay on the ballot in Colorado, effectively ending the bid states trying to bar him from running.

The results in North Dakota by the end of the night could be a dire sign for Haley as thousands of voters from 15 states and one U.S. territory head to the polls on Tuesday morning on the biggest day of the primary.

Trump has won every early contest except for Sunday’s primary in Washington, D.C., where Haley beat the former president among the small population of registered Republicans who live in the nation’s capital. 

Donald Trump has decisively beaten Nikki Haley yet again by winning the North Dakota Republican primaries in a preview of the dominant night he could have on Super Tuesday.

Donald Trump has decisively beaten Nikki Haley yet again by winning the North Dakota Republican primaries in a preview of the dominant night he could have on Super Tuesday. 

Republican presidential candidate Nikki Haley did not visit North Dakota for a campaign stop as caucuses have tended to favor Trump this campaign cycle. He easily won in Iowa and later won in Nevada, though Haley did not appear on that ballot

Republican presidential candidate Nikki Haley did not visit North Dakota for a campaign stop as caucuses have tended to favor Trump this campaign cycle. He easily won in Iowa and later won in Nevada, though Haley did not appear on that ballot 

The Republican frontrunner has a chance of winning all the states on Tuesday, leaving Nikki Haley’s path to the White House even narrower than before. 

He is already focused on November and his likely general election rematch with President Joe Biden

Former South Carolina Governor Haley’s future in the race is hanging by a thread, and a loss in most of the states including California will make comeback all but impossible.

Neither Trump nor Haley actively campaigned in North Dakota, though Trump found himself a reliable surrogate in North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum.

Burgum launched his own bid for the White House in June but was out of the race by early December, before any primary votes were cast. 

The North Dakota governor endorsed Trump in mid-January, directly ahead of the Iowa caucuses, which the ex-president soundly won against Haley and Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis. 

Burgum has continued to appear alongside Trump on the campaign trail.

He was with the ex-president last month in Las Vegas after Trump won the Nevada caucuses and voters picked ‘none of these candidates’ on the Nevada primary ballot, a symbolic vote for Trump over Haley. 

Caucuses have produced good results for Trump during this election cycles, as the MAGA faithful are so enthused about their candidate they’ll take time to attend the meetings. 

Thousands of voters from 15 states will head to the polls for what has been known since the 1970s as 'Super Tuesday'

Thousands of voters from 15 states will head to the polls for what has been known since the 1970s as ‘Super Tuesday’

In North Dakota, voters gathered at 12 sites around the state.

The state’s Republican party pushed voters to pay an annual $50 in dues to the party, but voters could also sign a pledge of affiliation with the party to participate. 

North Dakota is the only state without voter registration. 

Instead voters will have to provide identification to participate. 

At stake were 29 delegates. 

A candidate needed to get at least 20 percent support to earn some delegates and if a candidate got more than 60 percent it’s winner-take-all. 

By comparison, Washington, D.C. has 19 delegates while California, the most delegate-rich state in the country, has 169. 



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