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We scooped a life-changing £58m on a EuroMillions Lucky Dip – this is what we wish we knew before winning: Jackpot winners warn ticket holders to ‘be wary of people’ after huge scoops


Lottery winners have issued a stark warning to the latest British couple to bag a life-changing EuroMillions jackpot, advising them to be ‘wary of people’ after their £58million scoop.

Richard and Debbie Nuttall, from Colne, Lancashire, came forward today to reveal they had won a staggering £61,708,231 share of the £123m prize. 

The civil engineer and accountant, who are both 54, have disclosed their modest purchases so far – including new bedsheets, a hairdryer and golf clubs.

Now fellow Lotto winners Fred and Lesley Higgins, who won almost the same amount in 2018, have cautioned them to ‘not fear the money, but be wary of it.’

Fred warned Richard and Debbie: ‘Sometimes you need to be suspicious of people and wary of their motives, for example are people only being nice to you so you’ll give them some money?’

Fred and Lesley, from Dundee, won a staggering £58million on a lucky dip in July 2018

Fred and Lesley, from Dundee, won a staggering £58million on a lucky dip in July 2018

Richard and Debbie Nuttall, from Colne, Lancashire, came forward today to reveal they had won a staggering £61,708,231 share of the £123m prize

Richard and Debbie Nuttall, from Colne, Lancashire, came forward today to reveal they had won a staggering £61,708,231 share of the £123m prize

Fred and Lesley, from Dundee, won a staggering £58m on a lucky dip in July 2018, but nearly lost their prize after their ticket was ripped up and thrown in the bin.

After a painstaking two-week validation process, they were eventually awarded their riches – and used it to buy an £8m estate in Perthshire.

Asked why they decided to go public with their huge win, Fred told ITV News that they had at first been hesitant, but were eventually persuaded to tell their story.

‘People want to know who has won all that money, and they will find you eventually, so we thought we should get it out there,’ he said.

He warned the newest EuroMillions winners that he and his wife ‘still get press attention now,’ years after their win, ‘with certain media wanting to know our personal life, and what we are spending our money on.’

He said of Fred and Debbie: ‘While I can’t advise these new winners on what to do, I can speak from my experience.

‘We bought a few properties and made some investments.

‘I would say take your time, don’t go mad, but do enjoy yourself. Go on the holidays you want, buy the car, but be careful and be wary of people.’

Over the years, many other winning ticket holders have shared cautionary tales, including of how they lost their millions and how their fortunes changed their lives for the worse. 

Fred and Lesley Higgins from Dundee, pictured, won £58 million on the Euromillions in 2018

Fred and Lesley Higgins from Dundee, pictured, won £58 million on the Euromillions in 2018

The couple had previously lived in a house in Laurencekirk, Aberdeenshire before buying their new properties

The couple had previously lived in a house in Laurencekirk, Aberdeenshire before buying their new properties

Another winner also warned against trusting people, saying said they had been exploited by a friend who knew about their newfound wealth.

The lucky ticket holder told of how a friend had complained to her about being in debt to the taxman and almost losing her home.

After looking up her tax records, she said, she saw that her friend was not, in fact, behind on her payments.

‘When I printed out that page and sent it to her, well, that was the end of our friendship,’ the anonymous winner said.

Warnings have also come from Callie Rogers, who became Britain’s youngest ever lottery winner when she scooped £1.8million in 2003. 

Callie won the jackpot when she was just 16, living with her foster parents in Cockermouth and earning £3.60 an hour as a checkout girl at the Co-op.

While the huge sum changed her life, she said it was for all the wrong reasons.

Callie Rogers, from Cumbria, was Britain's youngest ever lottery winner (pictured in 2003)

Callie Rogers, from Cumbria, was Britain’s youngest ever lottery winner (pictured in 2003) 

Callie Rogers, from Cumbria, scooped £1.8million in 2003. After splashing it on drug-fuelled parties, she said it nearly broke her but thankfully she's 'now stronger'

Callie Rogers, from Cumbria, scooped £1.8million in 2003. After splashing it on drug-fuelled parties, she said it nearly broke her but thankfully she’s ‘now stronger’

‘Not knowing who liked me for me, and having all the stress of all the money, I just wanted to go back to having a normal life,’ she told ITV’s This Morning, adding: ‘I still struggle with trust issues.’ 

She has previously told how her lottery win sent her on a downward trajectory and has called for more protections for young winners.  

Rogers told Closer magazine in 2013:  ‘It was too much money for someone so young. 

‘Even if you say your life won’t change, it does – and often not for the better. It nearly broke me but thankfully, I’m now stronger.’

Another regretful winner also told of being awarded the prize turned her life upside down.

Jane Park, from Edinburgh, was just 17 when she won £1m after getting lucky with her first-ever EuroMillions ticket in 2013.

Speaking on This Morning, Jane revealed that she underwent a bum lift but was left 'swollen from head to toe' and in 'constant pain'

Speaking on This Morning, Jane revealed that she underwent a bum lift but was left ‘swollen from head to toe’ and in ‘constant pain’

The jackpot winner paid for a boob job, Brazilian bum lift and splashed out on a string of luxury holidays and fashion accessories.

She has since repeatedly said that winning the prize ruined her life, and even threatened to sue lottery operator Camelot for negligence, claiming someone her age should not have been allowed to win.

She confessed that it was only the advice of family members which stopped her going bust after she went on a spending spree, and has since warned others of the dangers of winning huge amounts of cash on the lottery.

‘It is very easy to spend the money and once you become aware that it is yours and how much you have got it becomes even easier,’ she said.

‘You think ‘Oh well I’ve got the money so I can spend it’. It just becomes easier to buy more stuff that you don’t necessarily need.

‘My family said to me ‘You have spent a bit of it now, you need to think about investing it’. So then I got some property and put some away in the bank.

‘At some point I had to take their advice or it could have went a completely different way.’



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